Thursday, March 26, 2015

2012 Honda Fit EV Concept Electric

2012 Honda Fit EV Concept Electric
2012 Honda Fit EV Concept Electric 
Today Honda unveiled the all-new Fit EV Concept electric vehicle and the platform for a midsize plug-in hybrid vehicle. Both vehicles are integral to the Honda Electric Mobility Network, the companys comprehensive approach to reducing CO2 emissions through innovative products, energy-management and energy-production technologies.With hybrid models becoming more of a mainstream product for consumers these days, automakers are now turning their attention on the next green frontier, all-electric cars. At the LA Auto Show, Honda lifted the covers off the all-new Fit EV Concept electric subcompact.

 Fit EV Concept "hints strongly" at the direction and styling for the upcoming production Fit EV all-electric vehicle, which will be introduced to the U.S. and Japan in 2012.
Based on the current Fit [Jazz in Europe and other markets], the EV production model will be powered by a lithium-ion battery and coaxial electric motor. The battery can be recharged in less than 12 hours when using a conventional 120-volt outlet, and less than six hours when using a 240-volt outlet.

Honda  Fit EV will have a top speed of 90 mph [145 km/h] and achieve an estimated 100-mile [160km] driving range per charge using the US EPA LA4 city cycle or 70 miles [112 km] when applying EPAs adjustment factor.For more efficient high-speed cruising, the vehicle can engage in a direct-drive mode, in which only the engine drives the front wheels.

Advanced Technology Demonstration Program
Honda will launch an Advanced Technology Demonstration Program this year to provide real-world testing of its new vehicles, as well as research into customer behavior and usability, public charging infrastructure planning and sustainability initiatives. Partners in the program will include Stanford University, City of Torrance, Calif. and Google, Inc.

Honda Electric Mobility Network and Energy Management
Together with the Honda FCX Clarity fuel cell electric vehicle, the Fit EV and the future plug-in hybrid vehicle are a part of the companys comprehensive approach to reducing CO2 emissions. Honda is unique in its efforts to create both environmentally-responsible products and the renewable energy solutions to power them. Honda is currently producing and marketing thin-film solar panels in Japan, and an installation is planned at Honda Performance Development in Southern California in early 2011. Honda is also using innovative ways to produce and distribute energy through sustainable methods, such as using solar power to produce hydrogen fuel from water. Additionally, Honda is developing home energy-management systems that utilize micro-cogeneration technology and solar cell modules to power and heat homes as well as charge electric vehicles. The Honda Electric Mobility Network joins clean vehicle technology, renewable energy production and energy management solutions for the benefit of customers and society.

Honda Environmental Leadership
The Fit EV and a plug-in hybrid sedan will be introduced to the U.S. and Japan in 2012, joining Hondas diverse lineup of environmentally-responsible vehicles, which include the FCX Clarity fuel cell electric vehicle, the Civic GX compressed natural gas-powered sedan (U.S. only) and four distinct gasoline-electric hybrid models: Civic Hybrid; CR-Z sport hybrid; Insight hybrid and Fit Hybrid (Japan and Europe only).

Honda was recently named Americas "Greenest Automaker" for the fifth consecutive time by the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS). The award is earned by the company with the lowest combined smog-forming and greenhouse-gas emissions (primarily CO2) in its U.S. automobile fleet.

Honda has led the UCS rankings of overall vehicle environmental performance since the first UCS study in 2000, marking a decade of Honda leadership in reduced vehicle emissions. Honda earned the recognition this year with an industry-best score based on model year 2008 data, the latest available for analysis.

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